Did You Spot These Plants on Your Spring Hikes?

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Halberd-leaved Violet (Viola hastata), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
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From the Editor

Here’s a great slideshow of photos from several NCNPS members of their weekend botanizing and attending events at the annual spring hikes.

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana)
Speckled Wood Lily (Clintonia umbellulata in bud)
Halberd-leaved Violet (Viola hastata)
NCNPS members photographing plants on a hike
American Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum)
Flame Azalea (Rhododendron calendulaceum)
Members head out on a guided hike
Painted Trillium (Trillium undulatum)
Canada Violet (Viola canadensis)
Happy Triangle Chapter Member David White with his auction purchases
White-flowered Red Trillium (Trillium erectum var. album)
Red-berried Elder (Sambucus racemosa)
Lizard, tadpoles, and reflected trees
Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.)
Plants lined up on the silent auction table
A fun group of hikers at Beech Flats
Foamflower (Tiarella austrina)
Author CoreyPine Shane autographs his book
Squirrel Corn (Dicentra canadensis)
Mountain Doghobble (Leucothoe fontanesiana)
Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides)
Mountain Stream
Mountain Chickweed (Stellaria corei)
White-fringed Phacelia & Canada Waterleaf (Phacelia bipinnatifida and Hydrophyllum canadense)
Buffalo-nut (Pyrularia pubera)
Bearcorn (Conopholis americana)
Wild Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Speckled Wood Lily (Clintonia umbellulata in bud) shows the marginal hairs on the leaves on Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Halberd-leaved Violet (Viola hastata), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Cheryl Williams and Laura Domingo
American Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. The yellow anthers distinguish this from E. umbilicatum. Photo by Susan Trabka
Flame Azalea (Rhododendron calendulaceum), Deep Creek Loop trail. Photo by Susan Trabka
A guided hike begins. Photo courtesy Thanh Huynh
Painted Trillium (Trillium undulatum), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Canada Violet (Viola canadensis), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Triangle Chapter member David White
White-flowered Red Trillium (Trillium erectum var. album), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Shirley Walker
Red-berried Elder (Sambucus racemosa), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Lizard, tadpoles, and reflected trees, Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.), Big Laurel / Alarka hike. Photo by Susan Trabka
The NCNPS spring hikes weekend included a silent plant auction. Photo courtesy Thanh Huynh
Our fun group at Beech Flats Quiet Walk. From the top Pat Holder, Gene Holder, Tom Harville, David White, Carolyn White. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Foamflower (Tiarella austrina) at Collins Creek Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Registered Herbalist CoreyPine Shane
Squirrel Corn (Dicentra canadensis) at Beech Flats Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Mountain Doghobble (Leucothoe fontanesiana), Collins Creek Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), Beech Flats Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Mountain Forest Smokies, Collins Creek Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Mountain Chickweed (Stellaria corei) at Beech Flats Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
White-fringed Phacelia & Canada Waterleaf (Phacelia bipinnatifida and Hydrophyllum canadense), Beech Flats Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Buffalo-nut (Pyrularia pubera) at Collins Creek Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
Bearcorn (Conopholis americana), Kanati Fork Quiet Walk. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lofland Gould
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One of the benefits of being a member of the NC Native Plant Society is our annual spring hikes weekend. Last spring we had 12 different hikes to choose from in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Nantahala National Forest. They ranged from the mild to the more invigorating; they were all wild.

The multi-faceted event based in Bryson City and organized by Diane Laslie and Paula LaPoint included a lecture by registered herbalist CoreyPine Shane, who spoke on southeast medicinal plants. Shane’s book is reviewed by our incoming NCNPS president, Ken Bridle, in this newsletter, A Review of Southeast Medicinal Plants.

Rounding out the NCNPS spring hikes program were a plant auction, a Friday evening social, and a variety of leader-guided hikes on Saturday and Sunday. Hike leaders were all expert botanists and trail guides. The event attracted members from NCNPS chapters including Blue Ridge, Southern Piedmont, Triad, Triangle, and some members-at-large.

Juney Whank Falls along the Deep Creek Loop trail, Smoky Mountains near Bryson City, NC. Video by Susan Trabka

Slideshow photos courtesy Thanh Huynh, Susan Trabka, Shirley Walker, and Lisa Lofland Gould. More pictures and a story by Ann Walter-Fromson, Botanizing with Friends in the Smoky Mountains, are also in this Native Plant News.


Andrea Thunem

Andrea Thunem is editor of the North Carolina Native Plant Society’s Native Plant News and a member of the NCNPS Southern Piedmont chapter.

Copyright © 2022 North Carolina Native Plant Society. All rights reserved.

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