Margaret Reid Wildflower Garden

This garden, which appears to be a natural Piedmont woodland, was actually almost entirely created by Margaret Reid. She introduced most of the plants, laid out the meandering paths and carefully managed the garden from 1943, when she and her husband Alton built the house, to her death in 1995.

She followed the principles taught her by B. W. Wells, early ecologist and former head of the North Carolina State University Department of Botany, by grouping plants in communities as they might be found in the wild.


Early March in the Garden

Dimpled Trout Lilies (Erythronium umbiculatum).
Dimpled Trout Lilies (Erythronium umbiculatum).
Bloodroots (Sanguinaria canadensis)
Bloodroots (Sanguinaria canadensis)
Hepatica americana.
Margaret Reid thought no child should grow up without the opportunity to see a hepatica.

Late March in the Garden

Toadshade (Trillium cuneatum)
Toadshade (Trillium cuneatum)
Piedmont Azalea (Rhododendron canescens)
Piedmont Azalea (Rhododendron canescens)
Crested Iris (Iris cristata) interwoven with some Wild Geranium leaves
Crested Iris (Iris cristata) interwoven with some Wild Geranium leaves
Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens)
Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens)
Toadshade (Trillium cuneatum) and unfurling Wood Ferns (Dryopteris - probably celsa or ludoviciana), with Spring Beauties and more ferns in the background.
Toadshade (Trillium cuneatum) and unfurling Wood Ferns (Dryopteris – probably celsa or ludoviciana), with Spring Beauties and more ferns in the background.

Early April in the Garden

Dwarf crested iris (Iris cristata), green-and-gold (Chrysogonum virginianum), and golden ragwort (Packera aurea) near the garden pond
Dwarf crested iris (Iris cristata), green-and-gold (Chrysogonum virginianum), and golden ragwort (Packera aurea) near the garden pond
Foam flower (Tiarella cordifolia)
Foam flower (Tiarella cordifolia)
Yellow Star Grass (Hypoxis hirsuta). This is in the lily family - not a grass.
Yellow Star Grass (Hypoxis hirsuta). This is in the lily family – not a grass.

Late April Blooms
Styrax grandifolius
Styrax grandifolius (Bigleaf Snowbells / Storax) attract bumblebees.
Smilacima recemosa
Solomon’s Plume would be lovely foliage even without its white plume at the end of the stem.
Viburnum acerifolium
Mapleleaf Viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium) is the latest of the 3 native viburnums blooming in the Reid Garden.
Viburnum dentatum
Arrowwood Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum) blooming with Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) in the background.
Galax aphylla
Galax has sent up its spikes above glossy new leaves.
Chionanthus virginicus
Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) perfumed the floodplain garden for a week or two.
Scutellaria serrata
Showy Skullcap (Scutellaria serrata) is a favorite flower in the garden.
Rhododendron catawbiense
Catawba Rhododendron
Chrysogonum virginianum
Green-and-gold carries on, brightening the paths.