plant-banner1

Plant Details

Cardamine concatenata [= Dentaria laciniata]

Cutleaf Toothwort

Scientific Name:

Cardamine concatenata [= Dentaria laciniata]

Common Name:

Cutleaf Toothwort

Plant Family

Brassicaceae Or Cruciferae (Mustard Family)

Native/Alien:

NC Native

Type:

Herb/Wildflower

Bloom Color(s):

White

Size in Feet:

.5

Light:

Shade

Soil Moisture:

Mesic(*)

Bloom Time:

Mar - May

Bloom Area:

Piedmont, Mountains

Habitat Description:

Rich, mesic forests.

State Rank:

No NC Rank Listed (*)

Global Rank:

No Global Rank listed (*)

State Status:

No NC Status Listed (*)

Federal Status:

No U.S. Status Listed (*)

Notes:

It’s a food plant for the caterpillars of the West Virginia White and Mustard White butterflies. Populations of both of these butterfly species have declined in recent years as a result at least in part of both habitat loss and the influx of Garlic Mustard (Allaria petiolata), a species native to Europe that is invasive in North America because it lacks predators here. The caterpillars of the West Virginia White butterflies in particular are able to digest only a few species of the mustard family, those with which the butterflies evolved. Garlic Mustard’s chemical composition is similar enough to Cut-leaved Toothwort’s to lure female butterflies to lay their eggs on it, but the resulting caterpillars can’t survive on a diet of Garlic Mustard. They need Cut-leaved Toothwort. https://the-natural-web.org/2015/04/26/cut-leaved-toothwort/

Habitat

Ashe County, Apr '09

image

Sharon Eller

Plants with Blooms

image

Tom Harville

Leaves

image

Tom Harville

Blooms

image

Tom Harville

Blooms April 2004

image

Jean Woods

Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record


Bird-Friendly Native Plants



Permalink - (right click to save this page to your bookmarks)

<<< PREVIOUS

NEXT >>>

Comments - Leave a comment or read what's been added!
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

back to top
go to gallery
back to Initial c Gallery
back to orchids
back to Carnivorous Plants
back to Trilliums