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Plant Details

Sarracenia leucophylla

Whitetop Pitcherplant, Crimson Pitcherplant

Scientific Name:

Sarracenia leucophylla

Genus:

Sarracenia

Species Epithet:

leucophylla

Common Name:

Whitetop Pitcherplant, Crimson Pitcherplant

Plant Type

Herb/Wildflower

Life Cycle

Perennial

Plant Family

Sarraceniaceae (Pitcherplant Family)

Native/Alien:

S.E. Native

Invasive Status:

(*Key)

Size:

1-3 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

Red

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Moist, Wet

Bloom Time:

March, April

Growing Area:

Coastal Plain

Habitat Description:

Wet pine savannas. Native to sw. GA, w. FL, s. AL, and se. MS, a Gulf Coastal Plain endemic; introduced in eastern NC (and likely to be found elsewhere outside its natural range). Sometimes planted in natural areas by carnivorous plant enthusiasts outside of its natural range, such as in the Coastal Plain of NC, where it has been seen in at least 3 localities. The NC population on Croatan National Forest, Carteret Co. was apparently introduced in the 1980s; it is not known whether this species will spread in NC, but it is persisting and has been independently “discovered” several times [Weakley 2015].

Leaf Arrangement:

Basal

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Simple

Life Cycle:

Perennial

Wildlife Value:

Has some wildlife value

Landscape Value:

Suitable for home landscapes

Global Rank:

G3 - Vulnerable (*Key)

Notes:

Clump-forming, carnivorous. Flowers are red, and the upper portions of the pitchers are white with red venation .

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Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=SALE4

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/sarracenia-leucophylla/



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