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Plant Details

Hypericum hypericoides [= Ascyrum hypericoides]

St. Andrew's Cross

Scientific Name:

Hypericum hypericoides [= Ascyrum hypericoides]

Genus:

Hypericum

Species Epithet:

hypericoides

Common Name:

St. Andrew's Cross

Plant Type

Shrub

Life Cycle

Perennial

Plant Family

Hypericaceae (St. John's-Wort Family)

Native/Alien:

NC Native

Size:

0-1 ft., 1-3 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

Yellow

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day, Part Shade - 2 to 6 hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Dry, Moist

Bloom Time:

May, June, July, August

Growing Area:

Mountains, Piedmont, Sandhills, Coastal Plain

Habitat Description:

Dry forests and woodlands (Weakley 2015). Sorrie (2011—A Field Guide to the Wildflowers of the Sandhills Region), states “Inhabits dry to moist pinelands, oak-hickory woods, and flatwoods, but sometimes also in wetter situations such as seepage slopes and cypress-gum swamps.” Uncommon in NC Mountains, common in Piedmont and Coastal Plain.

Leaf Arrangement:

Opposite

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Simple

Life Cycle:

Perennial

Wildlife Value:

Has some wildlife value

Landscape Value:

Not Recommended for home landscapes

Notes:

Weakley places the Hypericums in the Hypericaceae family

Young Plant

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Bloom

About 1" across

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Bloom Close Up

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Seed Pods

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Growing in its habitat

Growing in dry, sandy woods, St Andrew's cross has an open structure, small delicate flowers, bright green leaves and interesting bark.

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Paynter, August, 2013, Wilmington

Flower

One of the 4-petaled Hypericums, St Andrew's cross has leaves that are widest in the middle and unequal pairs of sepals (1 pair is hardly noticeable)

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Leaves

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Bark

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Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record


Bird-Friendly Native Plants



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