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Plant Details

Franklinia alatamaha

Franklinia, Franklin Tree

Scientific Name:

Franklinia alatamaha

Genus:

Franklinia

Species Epithet:

alatamaha

Common Name:

Franklinia, Franklin Tree

Plant Type

Tree

Life Cycle

Perennial

Plant Family

Theaceae (Tea Family)

Native/Alien:

S.E. Native

Size:

12-36 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

White

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day, Part Shade - 2 to 6 hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Moist

Bloom Time:

July, August, September

Habitat Description:

Habitat speculative, probably dry sandy ridges, near the mouth of the Altamaha River; believed to be extinct in the wild. It was native to the Coastal Plain of GA, where it was found by William Bartram near the mouth of the Altamaha River. It has not been seen in the wild since 1803 and is now considered to be extinct in the wild.

Leaf Arrangement:

Alternate

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Simple

Life Cycle:

Perennial

Wildlife Value:

Has some wildlife value

Landscape Value:

Suitable for home landscapes

Notes:

Last seen in the wild in 1803. This plant is native only to Georgia and is pretty particular about where it will grow.

Clump of Several Plants

image

23 October 2007, Lamtree Farm, Warrensville, NC
© Tom Harville

Multiple Blooms

image

23 October 2007, Lamtree Farm, Warrensville, NC
© Tom Harville

Three Stages of Opening

image

23 October 2007, Lamtree Farm, Warrensville, NC
© Tom Harville

Open Bloom

image

23 October 2007, Lamtree Farm, Warrensville, NC
© Tom Harville

5'6 in the Franklinias

image

Tom Harville

Franklinia Bloom and the fly

Lamtree Farm, Oct 2007

image

Tom Harville

Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record

NCSU Plant List


Bird-Friendly Native Plants



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