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Plant Details

Crataegus punctata [= Crataegus collina]

Dotted Hawthorn

Scientific Name:

Crataegus punctata [= Crataegus collina]

Genus:

Crataegus

Species Epithet:

punctata

Common Name:

Dotted Hawthorn

Plant Type

Tree/Shrub

Plant Family

Rosaceae (Rose Family)

Native/Alien:

NC Native

Size:

12-36 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

White

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day, Part Shade - 2 to 6 hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Moist

Bloom Time:

May

Growing Area:

Mountains

Habitat Description:

high elevation forests, balds, rock outcrops

Leaf Arrangement:

Alternate

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Simple

Wildlife Value:

Important for Wildlife

Landscape Value:

Suitable for home landscapes

Notes:

Attracts Birds and Butterflies.
C. punctata, often in company with C. macrosperma, comprises the majority of hawthorn forests, "orchards," and thickets seen in the high elevations of the North
Carolina Blue Ridge, in openings and disturbed Picea rubens and Abies fraseri forests

Flowers

Uncommon and limited to high elevations, Dotted Hawthorn is often found with Fanleaf Hawthorn (C. macrosperma). It forms most of the hawthorn forests and thickets seen in the high elevations of the North Carolina Blue Ridge, usually in openings of Red Spruce (Picea rubens) or Fraser Fir (Abies fraseri) forests.

image

C Paynter, May 2012, Watauga Co.

Leaves

Dotted Hawthorn's leaves have deep veins impressed on the upper surface. This, and the shape, are good field marks. Crataegus however is a confusing genus and the species names are still in flux.

image

Underside of leaves

The deeply sunken veins are even more obvious on the reverse of the leaves.

image

Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record


Bird-Friendly Native Plants



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