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Plant Details

Carya illinoinensis

Pecan

Scientific Name:

Carya illinoinensis

Genus:

Carya

Species Epithet:

illinoinensis

Common Name:

Pecan

Plant Type

Tree

Plant Family

Juglandaceae (Walnut Family)

Native/Alien:

US Native

Size:

72-100 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

Yellow, Green

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day, Part Shade - 2 to 6 hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Dry, Moist

Bloom Time:

April, May

Habitat Description:

Bottomlands, eastward persistent around dwellings and in pecan orchards, escaped to suburban woodlands, rural forest edges and floodplains, commonly cultivated.

Leaf Arrangement:

Alternate

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Compound

Wildlife Value:

Important for Wildlife

Landscape Value:

Not Recommended for home landscapes

Notes:

Native to the south central US; cultivars are widely planted in SE

Cultivar, showing the spreading crown of pecans grown in the open.

image

Wilmington, May 2011

Pecan's bark has narrow fissures and scaly ridges.

image

Wilmington, May, 2011

Compound leaf, 12 - 20" long

image

Wilmington, May, 2011

Flowers

image

Wilmington, May, 2011

Nuts

From Jack Spruill: "The photo is of a seedling pecan growing on my farm in Washington County...Pecan does not come up 'true to seed.' I have observed many seedling trees over the years, and it is rare to see any two produce the same shaped nut. All seedlings produce small nuts, but the shapes are slightly different. While pecan hybrids skip producing nuts some years for some reason(s), my experience is that a seedling will always produce at least some nuts."

image

Jack Spruill, Washington County, Nov, 2010

Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record


Bird-Friendly Native Plants



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