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Ev-Henwood walk

Sponsored by the Southeast Coast chapter

Sunday, May 13, 2012

The Southeast Coast Chapter returned to Ev-Henwood Preserve to see the Stewartias in bloom.


Clasping Milkweed, Asclepias amplexicaulis

Clasping Milkweed is recognizable by its clasping, opposite leaves with wavy edges and the typical milkweed flower.


Clasping Milkweed flowers


Blackroot, Pterocaulon pycnostachyum

Even out of bloom, Blackroot is distinctive with its fuzzy white stem and leaf undersides and winged stem (actually leaf bases that extend down the stem.) It has terminal spikes of silvery white flowers.


Close-up of Blackroot stem


Disappearing into the woods...

photo by Esther Murphy


Daddy Longlegs

photo by Esther Murphy


Big Gallberry, Ilex coriacea

Big Gallberry has slightly flattened, sweet fruit. The similar Gallberry, Ilex glabra, has round, bitter berries that often persist into winter.


Witchhazel, Hamamelis virginiana

Witchhazel leaves have a distinctive silhouette, with wavy margins and an uneven base.


Lichen on American Holly, Ilex opaca

The usually smooth, light bark of American Holly often has patches of red lichen. Photo by Esther Murphy


The flowers of Silky Camellia, Stewartia malacodendron, are well worth the walk!

photo by Esther Murphy


Mac shows off the Silky Camellia's flowers

Photo by Esther Murphy


Silky Camellia Woods!

photo by Esther Murphy


Closeup of Flower. Click on photo to enlarge.

photo by Esther Murphy


Ebony Jewelwing, a common damselfly, on American Holly, Ilex opaca

With its black wings, Ebony Jewelwing is difficult to see, perched in the shade over a stream. Photo by Esther Murphy.


Helmet Skullcap, Scutellaria integrifolia. Click to enlarge.

Coming out into old fields, we found Helmet Skullcap. Also blooming in the open fields were Nuttall's Lobelia and Eaton's Ladies'-tresses (not shown.) Photo by Esther Murphy.


Magical moment!

Spots on the camera lens lend a surreal touch to our outing. Thanks to Esther Murphy for her wonderful photographs!


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