The Triad Treasures Natural Diversity!


Organized in January 2004, members come from Alamance, Forsyth, Guilford, Rockingham, Stokes, and other counties. All welcome!

At right: Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on New York iron weed, Vernonia noveboracensis, late summer 2014, by Judy Stierand. (click image for full-screen)

Monthly Meetings

Members receive announcements about Triad Chapter programs. All (members and non-members) are also welcome to join an informal Triad Yahoo! Group for sharing announcements about local and regional native plant events, resources, and photos: triadncwfps.

Please join us first Wednesdays of each month September through May for programs, plant sharing, and plant fun. Explore natural areas with us at any time of year (usually within a day’s drive). For further information, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Meetings are at 7 p.m. at the Kathleen Clay Edwards Library, 1420 Price Park Dr., Greensboro, NC 27410 (phone 336-373-2923). All are welcome.

Calendar Item!

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Wednesday Wildflower Walks with Ann Walter-Fromson and Lisa Lofland Gould

(9:30 a.m. or 10:00 a.m. (see below for details))

(Bloodroot by Ann Walter-Fromson)

Join Ann Walter-Fromson and Lisa Lofland Gould for Wednesday morning wildflower walks in March and April co-sponsored by the Triad Chapter of NCNPS, T. Gilbert Pearson Audubon Society, and Forsyth Audubon. We will visit watershed trails and area preserves along with three new locations in Forsyth County to observe nature’s beautiful show of ephemeral spring wildflowers. Ann will lead the four walks in Guilford and Rockingham Counties and Lisa will lead the three walks in Forsyth County.

You’re welcome to join in for any or all of these walks. Wear sturdy walking shoes as trails may be muddy or slippery in places. You may want to bring binoculars (close-focus binoculars are particularly good for viewing small flowers), a walking stick, insect repellant, a wildflower field guide, a camera, water, and a snack. No pets, please.

The dates and locations for these wildflower walks are (click “Read More” for detailed descriptions):
9:30 a.m., Wednesday, March 14 -  Laurel Bluff Trail, Guilford County. Leader: Ann Walter-Fromson.
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, March 21 -  Salem Lake, Forsyth County. Leader: Lisa Gould.
9:30 a.m., Wednesday, March 28 - Cascades Preserve, Guilford County. Leader: Ann Walter-Fromson.
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, April 4 -  Emily Allen Preserve, Forsyth County. Leader: Lisa Gould.
9:30 a.m., Wednesday, April 11 - Knight Brown Preserve, Rockingham County. Leader: Ann Walter-Fromson.
9:30 a.m., Wednesday, April 18 -  Richardson-Taylor Preserve, Guilford County. Leader: Ann Walter-Fromson.
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, April 25 - Black Walnut Bottoms, Bethania, Forsyth County. Leader: Lisa Gould.

Please “Read More” for meeting locations and other details. Also find details in the March Nature Notes on the T. Gilbert Pearson Audubon Society website.

Read More!

Calendar Item!

Wednesday, April 04, 2018

Shawn Gagne, 41, Environmental Entrepreneur

(7:00 p.m.--welcome early to say hello)

Shawn Gagne helped plant more than 11,000 trees across 12 communities and 5 states in 2017.

Earning a Master’s degree in environmental science, with a focus on climate science, Shawn is in tune with today’s climate issues. As a scientist and an entrepreneur, Shawn believes that we can improve the environment by creating a market that reduces greenhouse gases by investing in trees in neighborhoods of US cities. “I immigrated to Greensboro in 2010 and went through a series of regional accelerator programs including Durham’s Groundwork Labs and Greensboro’s Launch program at the Collab. I am secure in the fact that Urban Offsets can stay in the Triad while we continue to expand nationally and internationally.”

Urban Offsets invented a process that essentially transforms the carbon market into a financial one. This includes understanding and grading the risk inherent in every offset, bundling different climate products together into so-called Sustainability Portfolios, and of course, funding neighborhood climate resiliency programs with every sale. One of the big advantages, Shawn says, with this new program is that it allows Urban Offsets to also track how much carbon dioxide (CO2) these new city trees remove from the air as they grow.  Urban Offsets manages the carbon credits created by those trees every year and plans to provide them to colleges and universities that are looking to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions in the future.“The challenge for us has been turning trees into assets for cities. By doing what we do best, we’re meeting the needs of three different groups all seeking sustainability strategies that support their unique missions: corporations, municipalities, and higher ed.”

Read More!

Chapter Activities

We have an annual member photo sharing meeting in December, where we also share seeds (and sometimes plants). Members often bring plants or other items as door prizes to monthly meetings. We also exchange plants in spring. In prep for our chapter's spring plant exchange, many members also pot up plants for the annual picnic plant sale that is a fundraiser for the scholarships the society provides to students for research and to attend the Cullowhee Native Plant Conference in July. The opportunity to participate in Cullowhee can be a transformative event for students, where they come into contact with an extraordinary mix of educators, growers, designers, and planners celebrating and promoting our fabulous native flora.

Extra Stuff

Triad Flora Report

Lisa Gould compiles a wonderful monthly Triad Flora report highlighting her native plant observations and those contributed by anyone in the community. It is a tremendously valuable tool for learning about our native (and introduced) flora in the wild, for exploring flowering times (and making a trip to go see something special or new to you!), for providing a record of our plant community through time, and for utilizing the knowledge and observational skills of our members. We will periodically post reports here Link to all the Flora Reports

Photos of Toad Trillium (Trillium cuneatum) and Virginia Heartleaf (Hexastyli virginica) are by Matthew Perry, included with the 31 March Flora Report.

To contribute to the Triad Flora report, send Lisa (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) your observations, including common name, scientific name (if possible), place observed (locale, town, county), date observed, stage (e.g., in bloom, in fruit, leaves only, etc.), and observer's name. Please report only for the following counties: Alamance, Caswell, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Montgomery, Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry, and Yadkin.

Please include only plants that are in the wild (native or naturalized)—no garden plants. Species with an asterisk (*) are not native to our area but have naturalized here.

Nomenclature is from Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States, Working Draft of November 2012, by Alan S. Weakley, UNC Herbarium, Chapel Hill NC. Available as a free download (a searchable pdf) from:

Invasive species status [marked with an exclamation point and a number] is from the NC Native Plant Society's Invasive Exotic Plants in NC – 2010, which is available at The Society ranks invasive plants by the threat level: Rank 1 [!1] = Severe Threat, Rank 2 [!2] = Significant Threat, Rank 3 [!3] = Lesser Threat, Watch List A [!4] = naturalizing and may become a problem, Watch List B [!5] = known threat in other states but not yet a problem here. This list is a work-in-progress—if you have comments, go to the web link for information on how to provide feedback.

The reports are currently emailed to Triad members and posted on the plant society's members only pages, but more may be available here, as well, before long, so please stay tuned.... To join the Triad listserv, please visit triadncwfps or contact Nancy.

NC Friends of Plant Conservation
To support conservation of the wonderful flora of North Carolina, you can join or donate to NC Friends of Plant Conservation. The NC Plant Conservation Program's staff manages preserves across the state and contributions c/o the NC Friends of Plant Conservation are greatly appreciated for the program's work acquiring and managing these unique and tremendously special communities. To learn more about the program, visit

Comments, photos, or updates for this page can be sent to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Picture Albums

Tater Hill Trip Tater Hill Trip (August 02, 2008)
Green Swamp Green Swamp (May 21, 2005)

Chapter Contact(s)

Triad chapter contact information

back to top